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Fish Oil Linked to Colon Cancer Risk

Fish oil — long encouraged by doctors as a supplement to support heart and joint health, among other benefits — induced severe colitis and colon cancer in mice in research led by Michigan State University and published October 2010 in the journal Cancer Research.

Don’t take this the wrong way though, this study seems to serve more as a reminder too much of anything can be bad for you. It’s also nice to contrast the information we hear, which is usually positive related to fish oil — omega-3 fatty acids. The fact of the matter is that the amount of omega-3 fatty acids we need for optimal functioning is still not known, so don’t go crazy with the supplements.

Fenton cautions people may not need to avoid fish oil; what the research shows is needed are guidelines on dosing. With any nutrient, there is a “bell curve” effect. On the left of the curve are those deficient in a nutrient; on the right are those in excess.

She said people already receiving enough omega-3 fatty acids through their normal diet and foods have no need for added supplementation.

[ScienceDaily]

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Following Lifestyle Tips Could Save You From Bowel Cancer

A study published on the British Medical Journal website suggest that following public health recommendation could reduce risk of bowel cancer by up to 23%. The study is not very specific as to causality, but at least supports the effectiveness of the public health goals.

The researchers created a healthy lifestyle index using internationally accepted public health recommendations from the World Health Organization, World Cancer Research Fund and the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations.

These included being physically active for at least 30 minutes a day, having no more than seven drinks a week for women and 14 drinks a week for men, being non-smoker, having a waist circumference below 88 cm for women and 102 cm for men and consuming a healthy diet

If all participants had followed all five recommendations, then 23% of the bowel cancer cases could have been avoided.

The researchers conclude: “Our study reveals the useful public health message that even modest differences in lifestyle might have a substantial impact on colorectal cancer risk and emphasises the importance of continuing vigorous efforts to convince people to follow the lifestyle recommendations.”

[BMJ]

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Latest in Clinical Nutrition (2007) by Michael Greger

In information packed and research backed dose of fun interesting …A quick, easy, and especially interesting way.

Weeding through thousands of researches published in the last year and selecting out the most interesting, practical, and groundbreaking findings from what the latest nutritional science has to offer.

httpvp://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=D97C091AA2069C7A

Read the full story

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Latest in Clinical Nutrition (2010) by Michael Greger

The Latest in Clinical Nutrition 2010 by Michael Greger

In information packed and research backed dose of fun interesting …A quick, easy, and especially interesting way

weeding through thousands of researches published in the last year and selecting out the most interesting, practical, and groundbreaking findings from what the latest nutritional science has to offer.

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QYLRKa9p0Rs

Posted in Featured, HealthComments (115)

Latest in Clinical Nutrition (2009) by Michael Greger

In information packed and research backed dose of fun interesting …A quick, easy, and especially interesting way

weeding through thousands of researches published in the last year and selecting out the most interesting, practical, and groundbreaking findings from what the latest nutritional science has to offer.

httpvp://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=DBA02DD311F1D505

Read the full story

Posted in HealthComments (24)

Latest in Clinical Nutrition (2008) by Michael Greger

In information packed and research backed dose of fun interesting …A quick, easy, and especially interesting way.

Weeding through thousands of researches published in the last year and selecting out the most interesting, practical, and groundbreaking findings from what the latest nutritional science has to offer.

httpvp://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=FD84B14C63A2AA88

Read the full story

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Game teach people healthy diet choices

A Georgia Tech College of Computing Ph.D. candidate, Andrea Grimes Parker, has shown that playing health-related video games on a mobile device can help adults learn to live more healthfully by making smart diet choices.

OrderUP! seeks to educate players about how to make healthy eating choices in situations nearly everyone encounters regularly in their lives. By casting players as virtual restaurant servers, Order UP! forces players to make healthy — and fast — menu decisions for a group of demanding, impatient customers.

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Structure your eating like a pyramid for an energy efficient day

An article in Lifehacker suggests an interesting way to structure eating; like a pyramid throughout the day. This is not to be confused with the food pyramid, although they have some clarifying information on that as well.

Most people, including myself, eat very little in the morning and then increase amounts of meals throughout the day. The pyramid method suggest to swap this around so that your first meal is the largest and then size decreases for the rest of the meals throughout the day.

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Get healthy – Try being a weekday vegetarian!

We all know the arguments that being vegetarian is better for the environment, for the animals and our own health — but in a carnivorous culture, it can be hard to make the change. Graham Hill has a powerful, pragmatic suggestion: Be a weekday veggie.  Watch his 4 minute talk to get some inspiration for some healthier living!

I think it’s a great idea which can get you started of on a healthier pattern. Even if you don’t do it every day of the week, try at least a Meatless Monday. Everything helps;  for your own health, the environment and the animals.

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Starve cancer with a plant based diet

A great video from TED where William Li presents a new way to think about treating cancer and other diseases: anti-angiogenesis, preventing the growth of blood vessels that feed a tumor. The crucial first (and best) step: Eating cancer-fighting foods that cut off the supply lines and beat cancer at its own game

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Researchers considers effect from multiple foods

Professor Inger BjörkA new study from researchers at Lunds University in Sweden have investigated the combined effect of a specific diet rather than focusing on single components. The results are quite staggering, and eating their diet show a reduction of cholesterol by 33%, blood lipids by 14%, blood pressure by 8% and risk marker for blood clots and inflammation in the body was greatly reduced while memory and cognitive function were improved.

These are quite impressive results, and it also show how it’s necessary to consider the diet as a whole instead of focusing only on single elements. No previous study has managed to produce similar effects on healthy subjects. They don’t know what specifically triggered the positive effects, but that’s also the idea behind it, that it’s the interaction of food together which is important and not each single component. Maybe the joint effort of healthy food is greater than the sum of its parts.

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Bill Clinton on why he eats a plant based diet

This is quite an interesting video showing an interview with Bill Clinton, where he talks about his change to a new and better lifestyle with a plant based diet.

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Contaminated Without Consent (Chemical Toxins)

Contaminated Without Consent is about “the hidden risks from chemical contaminants found in our homes, workplaces, the products we buy, and even our bodies.”

source: Contaminated Without Consent

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Type 1 Diabetes, Genetics, Environment, and Diet

On this week’s episode of Food for Life TV, Dr. Barnard gives an overview of how insulin is made. He also explains that type 1 diabetes is caused when the body produces no insulin. Research shows that this may occur when antibodies in your body fight off proteins found in cows milk. Dr. Barnard also outlines how people already diagnosed with type 1 diabetes can cut down on diabetes complications by eating foods that are vegan, low in fat, and have a low gylcemic index.

A search on PubMed does confirm that Type 1 Diabetes is partly genetic, ranging between 30-60%, while the rest is attributed to environmental enablers and causes which are not well understood. From the quick overview I am not sure if cow milk is one of the enabler as Neil Barnard pointed out but then again cow milk during childhood has been link to greater amount of allergies and weakened immune systems.

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Cheese and Other Foods that Make Diabetes Worse

On this week’s episode of Food for Life TV, Dr. Barnard explains that fatty foods, such as burgers, fried chicken, cheese, and even vegetable fats—like olive oil and peanut butter—can stop insulin from helping glucose enter muscle cells and cause type 2 diabetes. But building your meal with fruits, vegetables, grains, and beans will keep your diet low in fat and actually clean the fat from your body, allowing insulin to help glucose enter your muscle cells and reverse or prevent diabetes.

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